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Medicity plot allotment in SAS Nagar from Tuesday

Medicity plot allotment in SAS Nagar from Tuesday

Hoping to cash in on medical tourism, the Greater Mohali Area Development Authority (GMADA) will start allotment of land to various health institutes at the upcoming Medicity in Mullanpur from March 8 (Tuesday). The scheme will remain open till all plots are allotted on a lease-hold basis. In total, GMADA is offering 258 acre (one acre is 43,560 square foot or about the area of a football field) in Medicity Phases 1 and 2. Of this, around 50 acre has already been allotted to Homi Bhabha Cancer Hospital and Research Centre (under the department of atomic energy in the Centre) through the department of health and family welfare, Punjab.
At the Medicity, the Punjab government plans to have one medical university, one medical college-cum-hospital, one multispecialty hospital and 11 hospitals. “This is our ongoing allotment scheme, wherein all medical institutes would be allotted land. It would be on leasehold basis as per the policy of the Punjab government,” said Rajdeep Kaur estate officer GMADA.
“Hospitals in SAS Nagar have been getting patients from Pakistan and Afghanistan — for heart surgery, liver transplant, orthopaedics expertise and medical care. We are hopeful that the scheme would do well based purely on the business and commercial aspect of the project,” said GMADA sources.
“Punjab is linked with land route to neighbouring countries is hoping to make the most of the opportunity that the Medicity presents.”
PGI satellite centre planned on 10 acre
PGIMER’s satellite centre is also planned to come up in Mullanpur where it would provide out-patient department (OPD) screening facility that shall refer only tertiary care patients ( those in need of hospital and advanced investigation) to the PGI. The ` 500-crore project was approved by the central government after Punjab offered 10 acre to the institute for its expansion. In 2013, the PGI had approached GMADA and the Punjab government to seek 25 acre reserved for Medicity project in Mullanpur

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How About A Business Card That Can Also Read Your Pulse?

How About A Business Card That Can Also Read Your Pulse?

Business cards are designed to give people an idea of your profession and designation at a given company, along with the contact details and other information of course. But if you work at an innovative company like MobilECG, a standard business card just won’t cut it.

The brains behind the company have come up with a business card that comes with a built-in ECG that can read your pulse within a few seconds. However, the company has made it abundantly clear that this is merely a toy and not a substitute to the real thing. But it’s good fun to be able to have something like this in your wallet, especially if you work in the medical profession.

MobilECG mentions that this works on a tiny button cell (also known as watch battery) which can last up to 1 hour if it’s being used continuously. The company however mentions that the battery is only used if both the thumbs are on the sensors, so if you keep the card as it is, you should be able to use it for a week or two at least.

MobilECG aims to make electrocardiograms accessible and affordable to all. They have come up with mobile units that serve this purpose. So keeping their principles in mind, this seems like an apt way to showcase their products to the world. If you want one of these business cards for yourself, the company lets you sign up for it from their dedicated page here. It is currently priced at $29, which roughly translates

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Windows 10 Is Trying Really Hard to Kill Extra Antivirus

Windows 10 Is Trying Really Hard to Kill Extra Antivirus
Windows 10 might be the “most secure Windows ever”, but the unfortunate reality is that companies and hospitals far and wide are getting hacked faster than ever. As a result, Microsoft is bulking up its enterprise-level defenses.

Windows already ships with some built-in antivirus called Windows Defender. Currently, it’s a defensive program that looks at websites and downloads to try and stop you from getting hacked. Unfortunately, in the day and age of social engineering and spear-phishing, antivirus needs to be a little more proactive.

Windows Defender Advanced Threat Protection (shortened to WDATP, because there’s no way I’m typing that out more than once) is supposed to be that protection for large, company-wide networks. WDATP move the focus from monitoring individual files to the machine’s behaviour as a whole-rather than searching for the actual virus, it keeps an eye on symptoms.

If your machine starts connecting to weird ports or executing unusual PowerShell commands-behavior that’s out of the ordinary for the vast majority of users-WDAPT will flag it to administrators, providing an overview of current and past behavior for admins to look at.

Microsoft’s also trying to take advantage of the vast Windows install base to kickstart its antivirus program. Millions of suspicious files found on machines worldwide will be run on the cloud, building a giant centralized database of malicious files, but also malicious behavior.

WDAPT will launch later this year as an optional service for companies. But if the benefits of networked antivirus works out-and Microsoft can figure a way to make it work without needing trained IT professionals in the loop-it’s easy to see it make its way to consumers in the future. Hopefully, there’ll be enough time to come up with a better name.

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If These Scientists Get Their Way, We Will Soon Be Able To Hear Aliens

If These Scientists Get Their Way, We Will Soon Be Able To Hear Aliens

Why have we not received any call from the aliens out there yet? What if extraterrestrial observers called but nobody on Earth heard?

As scientists step up their search for other life in the universe, two astrophysicists from McMaster University are proposing a way to make sure we don’t miss the signal if extraterrestrial observers try to contact us first.

According to Rene Heller and Ralph Pudritz, the best chance for us to find a signal from beyond is to presume that extraterrestrial observers are using the same methods to search for us that we are using to search for life beyond Earth.

Here on Earth, space researchers are focusing most of their search efforts on planets and moons that are too far away to see directly.

Instead, they study them by tracking their shadows as they pass in front of their own host stars.

Measuring the dimming of starlight as a planet crosses the face of its star during orbit, scientists can collect a wealth of information, even without ever seeing those worlds directly.

Using methods that allow them to estimate the average stellar illumination and temperatures on their surfaces, scientists have already identified dozens of locations where life could potentially exist.

In a paper forthcoming in the journal Astrobiology, Heller and Pudritz turn the telescope around to ask what if extraterrestrial observers discover Earth as it transits the sun?

If such observers are using the same search methods that scientists are using on Earth, the researchers propose that humanity should turn its collective ear to Earth’s “transit zone” – the thin slice of space from which our planet’s passage in front of the Sun can be detected.

“It’s impossible to predict whether extraterrestrials use the same observational techniques as we do,” said Heller. “But they will have to deal with the same physical principles as we do, and Earth’s solar transits are an obvious method to detect us.”

The transit zone is rich in host stars for planetary systems, offering approximately 100,000 potential targets, each potentially orbited by habitable planets and moons.

“If any of these planets host intelligent observers, they could have identified Earth as a habitable, even as a living world long ago and we could be receiving their broadcasts today,” Heller and Pudritz wrote.

The question of contact with others beyond Earth is hardly hypothetical as several projects are under way, both to send signals from Earth and to search for signals that have been sent directly or have “leaked” around obstacles, possibly travelling for thousands of years.

Heller and Pudritz propose that the “Breakthrough Listen Initiative”, part of the most comprehensive search for extraterrestrial life ever conducted, can maximise its chances of success by concentrating its search on Earth’s transit zone.

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Apple iPhone 5S Could Be Half As Cheap Once The iPhone SE Is Revealed

Apple iPhone 5S Could Be Half As Cheap Once The iPhone SE Is Revealed

The iPhone SE is all set for an unveiling later this month as per innumerable reports in the media. New word from sources are now indicating that instead of completely replacing the iPhone 5s, the SE might actually have a different impact on the 2013 Apple flagship.

It is said that prices of the iPhone 5s could go down by 50% once the iPhone SE is released, indicating that the smartphone will not become obsolete with the arrival of the new iPhone. As reports have continually told us, the iPhone SE will be a replacement to the iPhone 5s and will borrow the same design as well.

It was largely believed that the iPhone 5s would reach end of life status once the iPhone SE is released, but that doesn’t appear to be the case, well at least according to this revelation by Ming-Chi Kuo from KGI Securities. Perhaps Apple will keep selling the iPhone 5s in developing markets like India where there’s still plenty of demand for the handset.

As for concerns about the customers confusing the two handsets, we don’t think that should be a problem considering the kind of hardware it’s expected to be packing in comparison to the iPhone 5s. As of now, the iPhone 5s can be bought for as low as Rs 21,499 (16GB). So this revelation tells us that the handset will be closing in on the Rs 10,000 mark once the iPhone SE has been launched.